EDUCATIONAL FILMS


  

Running Time: 11 mins.
Vault: EDUCATIONAL FILMS

Marie Miller and Jeff are faced with social trauma because they've let their relationship drift into what others perceive as going steady. Is that really what THEY want? "This question is not answered for them, and it is not answered for you" warns the title card at this film's opening. The angst-ridden self-examination by Jeff and Marie leaves the impression that going steady is about as much fun as an abscessed tooth. Thankfully, Jeff and Marie become aware of their dangerous lassitude and end the film smiling, carefree, and significantly further away from uncontrollable urges.


  

Running Time: 10 mins.
Vault: EDUCATIONAL FILMS

A Coronet classic features Bill, who has to be admired for willing to participate in a massive gluttony scene which has to be seen to believed. We first meet Bill at the dinner table, he can barely touch his food. Soon he gets a stomach ache, Mom comes to save him, tucks him into bed. Flash back to Bill at breakfast. Bill wolfs everything in sight. During lunch period, he gobbles his sandwich. Back to his bedroom Bill suffers horrible nightmares about the day's meals. Next day he's learned his lesson, and how. A must see!


  

Running Time: 14 mins.
Vault: EDUCATIONAL FILMS

Trains teenagers to act according to the rules of proper social etiquette. Promotes proper behavior as a means of gaining social poise and self-assurance. This film seems clearly to be a document from the postwar "behavior offensive," aimed at retraining adolescents to learn to be kids once again after experiencing premature adulthood during World War II.


  

Running Time: 11 mins.
Vault: EDUCATIONAL FILMS

The importance of good grooming is emphasized by showing how Don and Sue, a brother and sister, keep up their neat appearances. The benefits of not wearing red nail polish, "loud" sport shirts and "appropriate" blouses are driven home by reminding students that "all through the day, other people are looking at you."


  

Running Time: 11 mins.
Vault: EDUCATIONAL FILMS

How to say "no" and stand up to peer pressure without alienating your friends. A group of teens holds a "rap session" outlining various situations they got into, and how they could have stuck to their morality, but not made the others angry.


  

Running Time: 21 mins.
Vault: EDUCATIONAL FILMS

This vintage production stresses consideration and "correctness" but there are so many rules to remember that the kids hardly have any time for fun! Perhaps that was the point. Watch for the scene where "Frank" is advised to wear a "quiet pattern" for his tie as well as socks that don't clash. "Allow the ladies to be more colorful." Swell fun!


  

Running Time: 10 mins.
Vault: EDUCATIONAL FILMS

Fabulous 1930's Jam Handy explanation of how radio works, beginning with orchestra performing in the radio studio dressed in formal attire as if the radio audience was watching. The explanation of the electronics and the accompanying illustrations appear made more to impress than explain and end up doing neither. Still it's fun to listen to the proper, deep voiced, tuxedo dressed 1930's announcer read psuedo-technical jargon he hardly understands, and then announce what "Rubinoff and the orchestra" will play next. And of course, it is a Jam Handy film, and that means Chevy, so we listen on the car radio!


  

Running Time: 14 mins.
Vault: EDUCATIONAL FILMS

Excellent example of a confused society, clearly showing how it attacks and tries to destroy what it doesn't understand. Film depicts brutal attacks on a young intellectual woman who has been singled out as a nonconformist. Even her own parents conspire against her. She suffers the typical abuses from those who cannot understand her constructive attitude and superior IQ. They, on the other hand, can be seen undertaking activities that serve no productive purpose. They go on to demonstrate an obvious inability to do something as simple as select a sandwich. Does the young woman go on to greatly benefit the ignorant masses, perhaps with major breakthroughs in a scientific endevour? Or does the constant persecution and emotional pummeling drive her to a life of despair, making her goal become diabolical revenge as a major corporate embezzeler who opts for a life of crime and apathy? As this film asks, what do you think?


  

Running Time: 10 mins.
Vault: EDUCATIONAL FILMS

An old juvenile court judge named McKesson, who keeps referring to himself as "we" and "us," decides he wants to find out about drugs. The judge says this to the camera, but the words he mouths bear absolutely no relation to the words on the soundtrack. He drives to a house where he meets "Phyllis," a teenager who tells us (also out-of-synch) that when you smoke marijuana "everything speeds up to 100 miles an hour!" She meets "Chuck" (who is a "hype" and a "peddler") and starts wearing lipstick, becomes a junkie, loses her looks, goes through withdrawl (some good histrionics here) and reforms. Judge McKesson then tells us that the Russians are promoting drug traffic in the United States to "undermine national morale," and that the only way we can stop the spread of drug use is by using "good sense." The film concludes with a newspaper headline -- "America's Teen Age Dope 'Fad' Ending!" Another unique Sid Davis production.


  

Running Time: 11 mins.
Vault: EDUCATIONAL FILMS

Shows teenagers how to plan and attend a party, suggesting games to play and songs to sing ("Jimmy Crack Corn").

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